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Thread: prepositional phrasal verbs VS adverbial phrasal verbs

  1. #1
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    Default prepositional phrasal verbs VS adverbial phrasal verbs

    Dear teachers,

    How would you know which is which?

    Is the way to parse a phrasal verb is to see if the verb can separated from its particle by an adverb or not?

    1) "They were shone on by the everlasting Sun". Here "shine" and "on" cannot be separated by an adverb so it is considered as an adverbial phrasal verb because “on” is an adverb?

    2) but if we put an adverb into "shine on" like "The sun shone brightly on us" "shine on" is not an adverbial phrasal verb anymore because “on” here is a preposition?

    Hope it's clear...
    Hela

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Dear teachers,

    How would you know which is which?

    Is the way to parse a phrasal verb is to see if the verb can separated from its particle by an adverb or not?

    1) "They were shone on by the everlasting Sun". Here "shine" and "on" cannot be separated by an adverb so it is considered as an adverbial phrasal verb because “on” is an adverb?

    2) but if we put an adverb into "shine on" like "The sun shone brightly on us" "shine on" is not an adverbial phrasal verb anymore because “on” here is a preposition?

    Hope it's clear...
    Hela
    Here is a quote from the following website that may answer your question. Lists of separable and inseparable phrasal verbs are included.

    "Unfortunately, there is usually no indicator whether an idiomatic phrase is separable, inseparable, or intransitive. In most cases the phrases must simply be memorized. Below is a partial list of each kind of phrase."

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handou...slphrasal.html

  3. #3
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    Thanks Rusty.

    So there are transitive phrasal verbs (separable or unseparable) and intransitive ones? phrasal verbs are never copular?

    See you later.

  4. #4
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    Maybe these will work out: end up, turn out, work out.

    We knew she would end up a doctor. (she<->doctor)
    In spite of the rain, the party turned out delightful. (party<->delightful)
    The plumber told me that the patch would work out fine. (patch<->fine)

  5. #5
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    That's interesting! If you find some more would you send them to me please?

    Best regards

  6. #6
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    Hello!

    I read on the page "http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/eslphrasal.html" an explanation about intransitive phasal verbs using as example "catch on". According to the instance, you can change a direct object into an indirect object simply by adding "to". So, the word "to" makes acceptable the sentence: "She began to catch on to the math problem."

    1-So, I can add "to" + direct object to ANY intransitive phrasal verb (if the new sentence makes sense). Is it correct?

    2-Can I do the same operation with intransitive verbs that are not phrasal verbs?

    TIA

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andr&#243;nico
    Hello!

    I read on the page "http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/eslphrasal.html" an explanation about intransitive phasal verbs using as example "catch on". According to the instance, you can change a direct object into an indirect object simply by adding "to". So, the word "to" makes acceptable the sentence: "She began to catch on to the math problem."

    1-So, I can add "to" + direct object to ANY intransitive phrasal verb (if the new sentence makes sense). Is it correct?
    "To" may not be the best choice of preposition. Many prepositions will work well, although the meaning of the whole sentence will change to reflect the effect of the new word.

    For example
    catch up - "cover the distance between oneself and a moving goal"
    catch up with - reach the same level - catch up with my classmates (also to)
    catch up to - approach at a faster speed - catch up to the leading runner (also with)
    catch up on - become current - catch up on email after the weekend

    At the end of this reply I have taken that list of intransitive phrasal verbs and given my choice of a familiar preposition, where one came to mind easily. Let me know what you think of this list.

    2-Can I do the same operation with intransitive verbs that are not phrasal verbs?
    Yes, but I am not going to make you a list.


    Intransitive phrasal verbs with added preposition
    back down from
    back out of
    back up from
    bear up under
    blow in from
    blow over _
    blow up on
    call up _
    calm down from
    carry on with
    catch on to
    catch up with
    check up on
    check out of
    cheer up _
    clear out of
    clear up _
    close down _
    close up _
    came about _
    come along with
    come back to
    come by _
    come out to
    come over to
    come through _
    come to _
    cut in on
    die away _
    die down _
    die off/out _
    dress up in
    drive back to
    drop in on
    drop out of
    drop over to
    fall behind _
    fall off _
    fall through _
    fill in for
    find out about
    fly back to
    fly over _
    get ahead _
    get along with
    get around _
    get away from
    get by _
    get in _
    get off _
    get on _
    get on/along with
    get up from
    get through _
    give out _
    give up _
    go back to
    go off on
    go on _
    go out _
    go over _
    grow up _
    hang around _
    hang up on
    hold on to
    hold out for
    keep on _
    keep up with
    let up _
    lie down on
    look on at
    make out with
    make up with
    move over _
    pan out _
    pass out from
    pass on _
    pick up _
    pull in to
    pull out of
    pull through _
    ride over to
    run away from
    run down _
    run off from
    sell out to
    settle up with
    show off to
    show up at
    shut up _
    slow up _
    stand by _
    stand up to
    stay over at
    step aside
    take off from
    take over from
    talk back to
    throw up on
    turn around _
    turn in _
    turn out _
    turn up at
    wait up _
    wake up from
    walk back to
    walk over to
    wash out _
    watch out for
    wear off _
    wear out _
    work out _
    Last edited by danmahaffey; 02-01-2006 at 10:43 AM.

  8. #8
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    Thak you very much for the list. If I' m not wrong, wen you haven't added any particle, the intransitive phasal verb can't become transitive, OK?

    And when you have added a particle, the transitive phrasal verb become transitive with no changes in the meaning related in the page by using this particle, OK?

    Are there any polysemous phrasal verb that are separable in certain meanings and not in others, or cases when is intransitive in certain meanings and not in others?

    TIA

  9. #9
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    Dear teachers,

    Is the way to parse a phrasal verb is to see if the verb can be separated from its particle by an adverb or not? Examples:

    1) "They were shone on by the everlasting Sun". Here "shine" and "on" cannot be separated by an adverb so it is considered as an adverbial phrasal verb because “on” here is an adverb?

    2) but if we put an adverb into "shine on" like "The sun shone brightly on us" "shine on" is not an adverbial phrasal verb anymore because “on” here is a preposition?

    3) but when analysing "he turned down the radio volume" I was told that "down" was an adverb because we could separated it from the verb by the object = "he turned the radio volume down".

    so now I'm completely lost!

    Hela

  10. #10
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    Please, answer also my questions. Thanks

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