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Thread: types of adverbials 2

  1. #1
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    Default types of adverbials 2

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please correct my analysis?

    Europe (subj) gradually (adverbial of manner / degree?) became (copular verb) an economic community (subject complement) during the second part of the XXth century (adverbial of time).

    Thank you in advance,
    Hela

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Dear teachers,

    Would you please correct my analysis?

    Europe (subj) gradually (adverbial of manner / degree?) became (copular verb) an economic community (subject complement) during the second part of the XXth century (adverbial of time).

    Thank you in advance,
    Hela
    Looks right to me.
    ---- Pete

  3. #3
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    Thanks, Pete.

    Would you please tell me what's the difference between an adverb of manner, degree and approximation?

    All the best,
    Hela

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hela
    Thanks, Pete.

    Would you please tell me what's the difference between an adverb of manner, degree and approximation?

    All the best,
    Hela
    An adverb of manner tells the way something is being done:
    - The children played happily.
    - She slowly walked down the road.

    Once someone asked here if all adverbs of manner ended in "ly". No one had a reference to verify that, but no one could think of an example that didn't end that way.

    An adverb of degree shows the intensity of something, to what extent or degree it applies.
    - He almost arrived in time.
    - They all are very good students.

    I'd say that an adverb of approximation is a special case of an adverb of degree. Many discussions of types of adverb do not single this out as a separate type. The distinguishing mark of an adverb of approximation is that it tells how accurate some numeric quantity is:
    - There are exactly 100 cents in a dollar.
    - There are about 100 students in my history class.
    - Almost half of those students are freshmen.
    ---- Pete

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